Our Programs

Visual Arts & Exhibitions

Current Exhibition: Our Connection to the Land
Open NOW until March 15th, 2020

Our Connection to the Land explores the work of artists whose art practice reflects our relationships toward the land.  The works of Abiam Alvarez, Suzy Gonzalez, Narsiso Martinez, Karen Miranda Rivadeneira and Arleene Correa Valencia create dialogs from the food we consume to the distances between us and home. Through paintings, sculptures, mixed media, and photography these artists bring into discussion the personal narratives of their own experiences dealing with the agricultural industry, resilience, and acknowledgement toward the communities affected by social injustices.

Past Exhibits

On Film: Capturing the Then & Now

On Film: Capturing the Then and Now showcases the work of artists who use film to explore self-representation, identity, and pop culture. The works of Djali Brown-Cepeda of Nuevayorkinos, Eliana Cetto, Jazmin Garcia, Thalia Gochez, Omar Juarez (El Olms), Javier Mendoza Fonseca, and Felix Quintana invoke strong feelings of nostalgia, tell the often-bittersweet stories of diasporas, and speak to communities’ resilience through difficult times all while uplifting their truths.

Unicorns, Aliens, & Futuristic Cities

Unicorns, Aliens, and Futuristic Cities, explores the work of artists: Claudia Blanco, Veronica Rojas, Michael Menchaca, Javier Martinez, Stephany Sanchez, Jorge Gonzalez, and James Canales all of whom use science fiction and fantasy to reveal the nuances of history, culture, and the Latino identity.

7th Xicanx Biennial: Muxeres Rising

Muxeres Rising, our 7th Xicanx Biennial exhibition which showcases the diverse talents of thirteen self-identified Latinx women who are disrupting and redefining social norms through a variety of artistic media. Johana Moscoso, Sandra Antongiorgi, Yvonne Escalante, Pilar Agüero-Esparza, Mitsy Ávila Ovalles, Elizabeth Blancas, Erika Gómez Henao, Jessica Sabogal, Shizu Saldamando, Stephany Sanchez, Yolanda Guerra, Natalia Anciso, & Vanessa “Agana” Espinoza hold the roles that Latinx women have embodied in the past and present through narratives of community family, and homelands, all while openly critiquing repressive qualities of American politics and Latino culture.